Milwaukee 2,4 Volts Vitesse deux tournevis sans fil Kit avec deux batteries
Milwaukee 2,4 Volts Vitesse deux tournevis sans fil Kit avec deux batteries

Milwaukee 2,4 Volts Vitesse deux tournevis sans fil Kit avec deux batteries

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Réf.: 6547-22

[Nous contacter pour un prix]

10 jours
220 points

Milwaukee le tournevis sans fil est un outil très pratique avec autant de punch pour la plupart applications tournevis, dans une taille suffisamment petite pour s'adapter facilement à une ceinture à outils sans tomber ou prenant beaucoup de place. Inclinaison de la poignée offre une meilleure adhérence dans des situations de couple, et permet de travailler dans des espaces confinés. Le conducteur dispose de deux plages de vitesse- -200 et 400 tr/min- -de basse ou haute-couple travaillent, ainsi que six réglages d'embrayage qui offrent de 5 à 22 pouces-livres de vis de serrage. Ce kit est livré avec un 1/4-inch mandrin à clé accessoire pour lumière applications de forage. Tandis que l'outil dispose de la puissance nécessaire pour percer les petits trous pilotes- -et même certains chanfreins- - c'est tout d'abord un tournevis, et non pas un grand remplacement de même un petit bricoleur de perceuse sans fil. Le kit complet comprend le tournevis, deux 2,4 volts batteries, une heure de chargeur, un 1/4-inch mandrin à clé accessoire, un quatre-pièces ensemble de bits, et un résistant à l'impact, housse de transport qui détient le lot.

 


•Contient un sans fil 2,4 volts tournevis qui peut être utilisé aux vitesses de fonctionnement de 200- et 400-rpm•Vous pouvez également régler l'embrayage à 6 positions différentes pour un couple optimal
•Conçu pour un maximum de polyvalence, le tournevis pèse un peu plus de 1/2-livre et mesures à 9-3/8 pouces avec la poignée complètement étendu
•Le kit comprend également deux 2,4 volts batterie packs, 120 volts AC 1-heure chargeur de batterie, 1/4" chuck attachment, 4-pièce pilote/jeu de forets, et un impact cas résistant  

*****

I owned the slightly smaller single speed version and ran it for years until it finally gave out with an intractable switch problem which made the purchase of this two speed version sensible proposition.
I think this tool has saved my wrist, and it's a "must have" for any job which requires assembly, cabinet hinges, electrical work, and it will drive surprisingly large wood screws too. 5 stars for simple, logical, robust design (9 planetary gears), and it's small size is just right to get into tight places. Thank god it doesn't have rubberized racing stripes stuck all over it!

*****

I bought one of these about 5 years ago and initially used it at work (electrician). I have done hundreds, if not thousands of switches, plugs and other smaller jobs like that where a full size drill would be a pain. this little tool has never let me down. I stopped working 3 years ago to return to school and finish my degree and still use it around the house and for auto repairs - it is still working as well as the day I got it. I only plan to replace this if they come out with a lithium-ion battery equipped one. No, it will not drive a 6" screw into your deck, but if you think that is what it is designed for you are not too savvy on tools

*****

I used one of these for years working on ag airplanes, which consist of dozens of panels held together with hundreds of stainless steel phillips machine screws that cost about $1 each. The torque setting keeps you from stripping the heads. The lock setting will even let you operate "dzus" fasteners with a flat blade. The interchangable batteries keeps you going all day.
If you have lots of screws to take out and put back in, this tool will keep the blisters at bay! It ought to be great on sheet metal, too.

*****

I was given one of these by my brother a couple of years ago. He
works with computers, and had found it to be an invaluable asset, so thought I might like one. At that time my Carpal Tunnel Syndrome was getting bothersome, and using a manual screwdriver for any length of time was sheer agony. ( I've since had surgery to repair that problem, but I still love the ease of using this tool.)
This is the best cordless driver I've ever seen. The compact size, flex handle and light weight make it easy to handle and fit into tight spaces, especially with the offset driver head in case the space is a little too tight. Eliminates a lot of torture working under the dash in my car and in other equally inaccessible spaces. But for all of its small size, it kicks out an amazing amount of torque.

My only problem is that mine was stolen, so I've just ordered myself a new one. You can bet I will be a lot more careful about locking this one up when I'm not using it.

If you've got even one "handyperson" bone in your body, buy one of these for yourself--you won't regret it!

*****

Do you work in or own a auto repair or body shop? If the answer is "yes" then you have answered another question also, "Do I really need one of the cordless screwdrivers?". I own a automotive repair shop and I honestly do know what I would do without my three Milwaukee 6547-22 2.4-Volt 2-Speed Cordless Screwdriver!!! Other than batteries, this tool is going to last you a long, long time. Its compact size will speed up productivity by getting in those tough to reach places like under the dash and engine compartment. Great tool!!!

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You're in the bigs now-
This will be a step up for many folks from the typical household rechargeable "stick" drivers that typically must plug into the wall to recharge, typically taking overnight to do so, only to typically die after just a few 3" x 3/16ths wood screws into an untapped piece of typical southern pine [don't even think poplar]. Milwaukee, for most in the trade, has been and continues to be considered as a manufacturer of first class but no frills tradeline tools.

Sometimes hot ain't so hot-
Previous versions of this model had problems overheating the batteries and as you are probably aware, heat and batteries isn't a good combo and one that you'll sometimes get with "frys"; some units reportedly caught on fire and suffered a complete meltdown. However, this was a rare occasion and most cases of overheating just led to a very expensive and curiously short-lived battery[streetprices around $40-$50 per batt].

None-the-less-
Milwaukee redesigned the charging units [old Vs new = cooling vents on side Vs cooling vents on top respectively]. Another distinction between the old spontaneous combustion chargers and their safer successors is the handy little built-in bit compartment on the original charger has been removed.

Twice removed-
Sadly, Milwaukee as have many other manufacturers, moved the production of this model offshore, Japan specifically, but has not suffered in build quality as have many other tools making this journey.

What goes around-
Japan is now considered to be the Asian counterpart to "German engineering" and thier factory workers are paid premium wages, often in short supply leading Japan to respond by allowing more immigrants across their borders to fill the gap left behind as the majority of the Japan's workers moved into the technical valley from the industrial park, "uninterested in doing those kinds of jobs". Sound familiar?

Build it and they will come-
There are some relatively new kids on the block that directly compete with this stick driver, most notably Panasonic's facsimile [a worthy adversary] and newest of all managing a more innovative form factor is Bosch's Ion stick driver, both of which cost a tad more than Milwaukee's version, but arguably have some advantages over this "classic".

Two speeds better than one?
Hellsya! Especially when that speed is doubled. As with all powered drivers, the inverse rule of higher speed=lower torque ability applies. Hence, the greatest power differential is between lowest speed+highest torque setting["6" on the somewhat obscured scale]which can easily strip out sheetmetal and wood screws, Vs highest speed+lowest torque setting which can let you just snug that switchplate screw without hearing that soft but very unpleasant and all too familiar "crrraccck".

But have no fear-
Unlike many lesser competitors, especially "household" stick drivers, Milwaukee's torque settings offer a wide and *precise* range of torque settings for most applications [6x2], any even better, the very tactile ring and positive torque detents which are handily[but not so visibly]located on the ring just at the business end of this driver. Furthermore, the detents on this very tactile ring aren't limited to just six positions as the numbers would suggest, but many intermediate positions for that "just right" setting that can snug your fastener perfectly into place. For heavier applications, a little bee's wax or soap on the threads goes a long way and also helps to keep things from going squeak in the night.

Faster baby, faster-
The addition of the higher speed [400rpm] lacking on Milwaukee's less expensive model actually makes this stick driver capable of being a stick drill[a goal to which many stick drivers secretly aspire], but only for those with either a great deal of patience and time yet perfect for that decorative solid brass hinge on that music box you've been promising your ______ since _______.

"I'm giving her all she's got, Captain"-
Ok, four-hundred revolutions per minute is less than half that of the slowest speed of cheapest cordless drill but still good in a pinch and great when you have many many many screws.

It's a matter of perspective-
One warning: some may look at the pictures above and erroneously surmise this stick is capable of bending into a perfect right angle. It does not. More like 70deg or 120deg, it's a matter of perspective.

What's this thingy for-
While not a rubik's cube, this stick driver offers some very nifty controls. As mentioned previously, the torque setting is located on the black ring surrounding the bit holder: a perfect place and a perfect feel. Just below and very close without being in the way is the speed switch, not variable, just two clicks, forward=low, backward=fast.
Just below is a curious little sliding "safety" switch that moves side-to-side, unlike the speed control. Slide to the left and you can't engage the motor unless you are really really determined. I'm not convinced this is really necessary or even desirable [try getting that one little screw tightened that you can just about reach and. . .$#^$! You get the idea. Oh, now you can look for that screw that just fell off and bounced over. . .er. . .$)@#$!

Oh, here it is-
Just below the questionable safety switch is a "momentary" switch[read "must keep pressing"] allowing your thumb to easily toggle the power in either direction. And if you aren't already aware, "reverse" can be a very good thing and just like that time you got your car stuck in the mud, being able to toggle between forward and reverse quickly can be real handy. However, unlike that particular fond memory, you won't hear any gears grinding.

The bottomline-
So how does this all translate in the real world? Wonderfully. . .if your criteria are precision over brute force and versatility over speed. This model has survived many years with little modification. All the controls are placed where they should be placed, feel how they should feel, even after many years of use, and even after enough time has passed that most of the fine print etched onto the plastic housing has become unrecognizable. The heft is enough to let you know you don't have a toy in your hand [approx. 14.2oz w/batt], but light enough for either gender and even for those challenged by limited range or motion that would restrict the use of a "manual" screwdriver, and balance is good [about 55/45 w/batt].

Does it come in colors?
This is one of those crossover tools that is as appropriate to find in the bottom left kitchen drawer of a designer kitchen as it would be to carry in a battle-worn not-so-pretty toolbox. The bits supplied are good quality standard 1/4inch hex feed that firmly snap into place without fearing an "accidental discharge" or feeling wobbly. The durablity, size, weight, power, precision, versatility, and feel means autotechs love these for interior work, A/C mechanics love these for control panels and tight spaces, woodworkers love these for attaching hardware to their projects, and I hear tell trade carpenters in California use these to frappe their eight dollar Starbuck's mocha lattes'.
Sorry, no chartruese but you do get a very nice, heavy, polished drill chuck attachment to show off to your friends or take down the neighbor's plastic, faded pink flamingo with the missing leg at about forty paces, gratis! Apparently, their engineers have been locked away for the last decade and someone needs to get word to them that hex-end drill bits are no longer just a distant dream.

It's all that and a bag of chips-
So why the four stars?!?!?! Well, as stated, this model has been around for a long time. I mean a *very* long time. Long enough to design an improved case layout to allow for an unshifting collection of bits and a special place for the very shiny, but not-so-cheap and decidedly overwieght close-quarter angle attachment with that odd thumb? brace that usually manages to fall off before you reach whatever it is you're trying to reach. Battery life is fair, not great[you will need the two batteries], and the charger could be faster. These issues may appear nitpicking to some, but for the hundred bucks Milwaukee has been collecting for each of these and for the three decades they've been collecting, are these things really too much to ask for in return?

*****

This is a great cordless screwdriver. In fact, for the price that it costs to buy a good quality cordless drill, one can buy this screwdriver, which will handle most quick projects, and a decent corded drill. That will give you the best of both worlds. The Milwaukee is light weight and versatile, and will handle screws and bolts, as well as drilling small holes (you'll have to buy hex shank bits or the optional chuck). Most people lug around a cordless drill that has much more power than they need. This offers just enough power and is so light and easy. The few times that you do need real power and speed, just plug in your corded drill. If you do buy the Milwaukee, get the model with 26 lbs. torque and two batteries are a must.

*****

I bought 2 of these cordless screwdrivers to help me in my job as a mechanical engineer and product designer. I kept one for myself and the other was for everybody else! It proved invaluable when assembling complex prototype instruments. I eventually bought a second battery pack, a drill chuck and a 1/4" socket adaptor with various nut driving sockets.
I'd forgotten about that wonderful tool until I recently had to disassemble, clean and reassemble a banjo with 50 brackets. The screws that held the brackets were very tight and after struggling with a few I remembered that fantastic screwdriver.

I happily found that Amazon was selling an ideal set; screwdriver with two battery packs, drill chuck, and 1/4" adaptor in a great case.

I find that it is really an indispensable tool if you do a lot of screwing (pardon my English). The banjo came apart and went together most handily. I ordered a number of long hex sockets to fit the various sizes of banjo nuts, and I'm delighted every time I use it. The torque setting lets me pick the right value to appropriately tension the bracket screws.

All in all, I'm delighted with this tool and very highly recommend it to anybody dealing with assembly of many fasteners. It is also a very handy light duty electric drill.

*****

I first fell in love with this type of tool working on PC assembly line; we used a Panasonic version of it. I liked it very much: black and yellow, very handy, improving productivity by about 350% (!). I wanted it. I did not know how to get it. I was so frustrated I didn't own one that I absolutely frgot I could use Internet to look for one. Of course, I started searching for Panasonic, and I found the specs on their website, but still could not locate the reseller. And, doing my search on 2.4V cordless tools, I found this one. Milwaukee. I did not like the idea to miss that "black and yellow", but, I looked further in specks and options, and I decided to det a kit with 8-bit set and stuff. Men, was I surprised when I received the tool and realized it was even better than Panasonic! It seemed lighter, more powerful, very balanced (it is important! unbalanced damage the wrist even worse than regular screwdriver), nice kit, Milwaukee's warranty... Enough poetry. I use it everywhere: assembling PCs, server racks, fixing stuff around my house, drilling, working on my old car, to name a few activities... Using mine for over 2 years, very satisfied with it. Even want to get another one, to keep in the glass-and-wood showcase, to show everybody and boast of...

*****

I purchased this primarily to unscrew video game systems forrepair and have not regretted the purchase. Though at 109 bucks it isnot exactly an impulse item, for me it was since I figured the more you pay the better the quality right? heres what you get for that the price: -three screwdriver bits-two phillips(one long bit and one short), and one slotted bit. -A drill chuck, chuck key and three drill bits -charger and two batteries -bit for socket sets I have not regretted making the purchase as it does the job very well of removing screws at a rapid clip. It has a variable torque/speed setting, you sacrifice one for the other, it has a high, medium and low power setting. (I have not read the manual in its entirety so I don't know what it does. It has no noticeable effect when switched in either position)It has separate forward and reverse buttons and a locking feature to turn the screw manually. It comes in a cheesy plastic carrying case with plastic locking clips (not very durable) but the case itself is solid.the only problem that I could see is that the screw driver bits are not magnetized, which can be a real pain when handling small screws in tight spots. Overall this is a very good addition to any tool box and fully worth the higher price tag

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